Frequently Asked Questions

The world always looks brighter from behind a smile.

Brushing with braces

Brushing with braces

Good oral hygiene maintained by brushing and flossing is mandatory especially with braces. Brushing after every meal is important to keep your teeth and gums healthy. If flossing is difficult with braces use a water pic ( water flosser) to remove food sticking between your teeth and around your braces.Food left sticking around your braces will cause cavities and gum inflammation and bleeding.

Posted by Hanan Dental Health Clinic on Thursday, July 6, 2017

Clear Braces

  • Are either plastic or ceramic. Ceramic are more durable. They a little more expensive than metal braces however the treatment outcome is never affected by the type of braces used.

REMOVABLE PLASTIC APPLIANCES

Removable plastic appliances : have a plastic base and wire parts . They are used to move the teeth. They are used for simple tooth movements and for correcting simple malocclusion involving only one or two teeth. They are the least expensive orthodontic appliances.

Proper Tooth Brushing

Proper Tooth Brushing

Proper Tooth Brushing

Posted by Hanan Dental Health Clinic on Monday, August 7, 2017

HOW TO BRUSH YOUR TEETH ?

  • step 1
  • Start with the outside of the teeth, with the brush at a straight angle. Use circular, vibrating motions.
  • Step 2
  • Clean the area between the gums and braces by angling the brush down (up for the lower jaw). Keep moving in a small circular motion.
  • Step 3
  • Clean the rest of the outside of the teeth by angling the brush up (down for the lower jaw).
  • Step 4
  • Carefully brush the chewing surface of both the upper and lower jaw.
  • Step 5
  • Finish by brushing the inside of the teeth.

AGE GROUPS SUITABLE FOR ORTHODONTIC TREATMENT

Elderly persons can use braces to adjust their teeth, this is essential to preserve their periodontal tissues ( teeth and bone support) , however treatment is more prolonged than in younger persons.

METAL BRACES

  • Most commonly used braces, they come in many prescriptions. Can use colorful o ties to decorate your braces each visit.

CLEAR ALIGNERS

  • Like Invisalin, Ecliners ,Kline or clear path. These are clear removable appliances made from a thermoplastic material to adjust the teeth. Treatment procedure may involve from 15 to 30 aligners depending on the type of malocclusion. Aligners are more expensive than braces if properly done in a certified laboratory. Treatment results and bite adjustment is not as accurate as when using braces.

EXTRACTION - REMOVING UPPER PREMOLARS TO CORRECT OVERJET - ORTHODONTIC TREATMENT

LASER treatment for a gummy smile.

What Steps Are Involved in Preparing a Tooth for a Crown?

Preparing a tooth for a crown usually requires two visits to the dentist
– The first step involves examining and preparing the tooth
– The second visit involves placement of the permanent crown.

  • Because temporary dental crowns are just that — a temporary fix until a permanent crown is ready — most dentists suggest that a few precautions. These include:
  • – Avoid sticky, chewy foods (for example, chewing gum, caramel), which have the potential of grabbing and pulling off the crown.
  • – Minimize use of the side of your mouth with the temporary crown. Shift the bulk of your chewing to the other side of the mouth.
  • – Avoid chewing hard foods (such as raw vegetables), which could dislodge or break the crown.
  • – Slide flossing material out-rather than lifting out-when cleaning your teeth. Lifting the floss out, as you normally would, might pull off the temporary crown.

 

How Should I Care for My Temporary Dental Crown?

Because temporary dental crowns are just that — a temporary fix until a permanent crown is ready — most dentists suggest that a few precautions. These include:

– Avoid sticky, chewy foods (for example, chewing gum, caramel), which have the potential of grabbing and pulling off the crown.

– Minimize use of the side of your mouth with the temporary crown. Shift the bulk of your chewing to the other side of the mouth.

– Avoid chewing hard foods (such as raw vegetables), which could dislodge or break the crown.

– Slide flossing material out-rather than lifting out-when cleaning your teeth. Lifting the floss out, as you normally would, might pull off the temporary crown.

WHAT PROBLEMS COULD DEVELOP WITH A DENTAL CROWN ?

  • Discomfort or sensitivity. Your newly crowned tooth may be sensitive immediately after the procedure as the anesthesia begins to wear off. If the tooth that has been crowned still has a nerve in it, you may experience some heat and cold sensitivity. Your dentist may recommend that you brush teeth with toothpaste designed for sensitive teeth. Pain or sensitivity that occurs when you bite down usually means that the crown is too high on the tooth. If this is the case, call your dentist. He or she can easily fix the problem.
  • -Chipped crown. Crowns made of all porcelain can sometimes chip. If the chip is small, a composite resin can be used to repair the chip with the crown remaining in your mouth. If the chipping is extensive, the crown may need to be replaced.
  • -Loose crown. Sometimes the cement washes out from under the crown. Not only does this allow the crown to become loose, it allows bacteria to leak in and cause decay to the tooth that remains. If a crown feels loose, contact your dentist’s office.
  • -Crown falls off. Sometimes crowns fall off. Usually this is due to an improper fit, a lack of cement, or a very small amount of tooth structure remaining that the crown can hold on to. If this happens, clean the crown and the front of the tooth. You can replace the crown temporarily using dental adhesive or temporary tooth cement that is sold in stores for this purpose. Contact your dentist’s office immediately. He or she will give you specific instructions on how to care for the tooth and crown for the day or so until you can be seen for an evaluation. Your dentist may be able to re-cement the crown in place; if not, a new crown will need to be made.
  • -Dark line on crowned tooth next to the gum line. A dark line next to the gum line of your crowned tooth is normal, particularly if you have a porcelain-fused-to-metal crown. This dark line is simply the metal of the crown showing through. While not a problem in itself, the dark line is cosmetically unacceptable and your dentist may have to replace the crown .

WHAT TYPES OF CROWNS ARE AVAILABLE ?

  • Permanent crowns can be made from stainless steel, all metal (such as gold or another alloy), porcelain-fused-to-metal, all resin, or all ceramic.
  • 1- Stainless steel crowns are prefabricated crowns that are used on permanent teeth primarily as a temporary measure. The crown protects the tooth or filling while a permanent crown is made from another material. For children, a stainless steel crown is commonly used to fit over a primary tooth that’s been prepared to fit it. The crown covers the entire tooth and protects it from further decay. When the primary tooth comes out to make room for the permanent tooth, the crown comes out naturally with it. In general, stainless steel crowns are used for children’s teeth because they don’t require multiple dental visits to put in place and so are more cost- effective than custom-made crowns and prophylactic dental care needed to protect a tooth without a crown.
  • 2- Metals used in crowns include gold alloy, other alloys (for example, palladium), or a base-metal alloy (for example, nickel or chromium). Compared with other crown types, less tooth structure needs to be removed with metal crowns, and tooth wear to opposing teeth is kept to a minimum. Metal crowns withstand biting and chewing forces well and probably last the longest in terms of wear down. Also, metal crowns rarely chip or break. The metallic color is the main drawback. Metal crowns are a good choice for out-of-sight molars.
  • 3- Porcelain-fused-to-metal dental crowns can be color matched to your adjacent teeth (unlike the metallic crowns). However, more wearing to the opposing teeth occurs with this crown type compared with metal or resin crowns. The crown’s porcelain portion can also chip or break off. Next to all-ceramic crowns, porcelain-fused-to-metal crowns look most like normal teeth. However, sometimes the metal underlying the crown’s porcelain can show through as a dark line, especially at the gum line and even more so if your gums recede. These crowns can be a good choice for front or back teeth.
  • 4- All-resin dental crowns are less expensive than other crown types. However, they wear down over time and are more prone to fractures than porcelain-fused-to-metal crowns.
  • 5- All-ceramic or all-porcelain dental crowns provide better natural color match than any other crown type and may be more suitable for people with metal allergies. However, they are not as strong as porcelain-fused-to-metal crowns and they wear down opposing teeth a little more than metal or resin crowns. All-ceramic crowns are a good choice for front teeth.
  • 6- Temporary versus permanent. Temporary crowns can be made in your dentist’s office, whereas permanent crowns are made in a dental laboratory. Temporary crowns are made of acrylic or stainless steel and can be used as a temporary restoration until a permanent crown is constructed by a lab.
  • 7-Zircon or milled crown which are digitally constructed either in an office that has the software and hardware to produce them or in a dental lab. Dental offices that have the software and hardware have the ability to produce a crown in one visit with no need for a temporary. These crowns require no impression .

Why Is a Dental Crown Needed?

  • A dental crown may be needed in the following situations:
  • 1-To protect a weak tooth (for instance, from decay) from breaking or to hold together parts of a cracked tooth.
  • 2- To restore an already broken tooth or a tooth that has been severely worn down.
  • 3- To cover and support a tooth with a large filling when there isn’t a lot of tooth left.
  • 4- To hold a dental bridge in place.
  • 5- To cover misshapened or severely discolored teeth.
  • 6- To cover a dental implant.

How Long Do Dental Crowns Last?

  • A dental crown may be needed in the following situations:
  • 1-To protect a weak tooth (for instance, from decay) from breaking or to hold together parts of a cracked tooth.
  • 2- To restore an already broken tooth or a tooth that has been severely worn down.
  • 3- To cover and support a tooth with a large filling when there isn’t a lot of tooth left.
  • 4- To hold a dental bridge in place.
  • 5- To cover misshapened or severely discolored teeth.
  • 6- To cover a dental implant.

Is there a Dental Crown for Children?

For children, a crown may be used on primary (baby) teeth in order to:

– Save a tooth that has been so damaged by decay that it can’t support a filling.
– Protect the teeth of a child at high risk for tooth decay, especially when a child has difficulty keeping up with daily oral hygiene.
– Decrease the frequency of general anesthesia for children unable because of age, behavior, or medical history to fully cooperate with the requirements of proper dental care.

Are dental implants expensive?

  • At the outset, implants are more expensive than other tooth-replacement methods such as dentures or bridgework. But they also last many years longer and in fact should never need replacement. So they offer the best, most cost-effective option when viewed as a long-term investment in your health, comfort and well-being.

CAN ANYONE GET DENTAL IMPLANTS ?

In most cases, anyone healthy enough to undergo a routine dental extraction or oral surgery can be considered for a dental implant. Patients should have healthy gums and enough bone to hold the implant. They also must be committed to good oral hygiene and regular dental visits. Heavy smokers, people suffering from uncontrolled chronic disorders   such as diabetes or heart disease — or patients who have had radiation therapy to the head/neck area need to be evaluated on an individual basis. If you are considering implants, talk to your dentist to see if they are right for you.

WHAT ARE THE ADVANTAGES OF DENTAL IMPLANTS ?

There are many advantages to dental implants, including:

Improved appearance. Dental implants look and feel like your own teeth. And because they are designed to fuse with bone, they become permanent.

Improved speech. With poor-fitting dentures, the teeth can slip within the mouth causing you to mumble or slur your words. Dental implants allow you to speak without the worry that teeth might slip.

Improved comfort. Because they become part of you, implants eliminate the discomfort of removable dentures.

Easier eating. Sliding dentures can make chewing difficult. Dental implants function like your own teeth, allowing you to eat your favorite foods with confidence and without pain.

Improved self-esteem. Dental implants can give you back your smile and help you feel better about yourself.

Improved oral health. Dental implants don’t require reducing other teeth, as a tooth-supported bridge does. Because nearby teeth are not altered to support the implant, more of your own teeth are left intact, improving long-term oral health. Individual implants also allow easier access between teeth, improving oral hygiene.

Durability. Implants are very durable and will last many years. With good care, many implants last a lifetime

IMPLANTS

 

Can my body reject a dental implant?

Strictly speaking, implants can’t be rejected because they contain no living cells or genetically coded material. The titanium of which they are made is completely biocompatible, and allergies are extremely rare. But an implant can fail to integrate with the jawbone if an infection develops in the absence of good oral hygiene, or if it is subjected to biting forces too soon. However, this is rare; implants regularly achieve success rates in excess of 95%.